5 Digital Marketing Strategies to Overcome

by Kevin Ekmark May 3rd, 2012 

marketing-strategies

If you pay attention to the blogosphere at all, you are well aware of the fact that it is becoming extremely difficult to keep up with digital marketing. Most of us are left with more questions than answers, but thankfully, through lots of experimentation and research, you can stay ahead of the curve. Here are a few of the digital marketing strategies that SEMs and SEOs are trying to overcome right now.

  • Is Natural Link Building Still Worth It? – As the semantic web continues to evolve, SEMs are wondering how much energy should be spent building their natural links when compared to spending their time elsewhere. As of now, natural links are still being used as indicators of trustworthiness, but for how much longer? Check out Jon Cooper's research with both sides of natural link building: The Natural Link Is Making a Comeback and 24 SEO Experts Discuss Links vs. Tweets.
  • Should I Be Spending Time on the Seemingly Void of Life Google+? – Personally, I have a tough time spending time on Google+ for extended periods of time. It is basically a gathering place for SEMs. That's fine and dandy, but does your web presence benefit from having a profile or business page on Google+? If you're in tune with Google, you know how much it loves itself. For what it's worth, I use it to share links from posts that I write and from my clients. Why? Because Google is definitely paying attention. Here is Rand Fishkin explaining Why Every Marketer Now Needs A Google Plus Strategy after Google Search Plus Your World.
  • Email Marketing Is Dead… Right? – With everyone screaming left and right about social media strategies and SEO, email marketing can easily find itself lost in the mix. Email marketing definitely isn't sexy these days, but there it is still a worthwhile endeavor… When thoughtfully implemented. Chris Brogan seems to think that Email Marketing Is Not Dead. What do you think?
  • Meta Tags… Enough Said. – As the web becomes more and more saturated with competition (and content), SEMs and SEOs really need to become more creative with their meta-data. Google is pushing this hard as well, with even Matt Cutts advising that we create compelling meta descriptions. Are you writing for Google, the user, or both?
  • Should Everyone Switch Over to Mobile Friendly Sites – Yes. Your site should be mobile responsive. Personally, I hate going to a website on my iPhone where I am redirected to a mobile site. They just seem so… bad! Mobile responsive designed sites adapt to a mobile device without destroying its usability and basic design. We all know that brands need better mobile optimization, but the big question is which way is best. I really enjoy the new mobile responsive themes coming from StudioPress. It is my suspicion that most developers and SEMs will enjoy it too, as anyone who is accustomed to WordPress will find it easy to customize.

Digital marketing is evolving at an extremely rapid pace. Keeping up with the changes doesn't have to give you a headache as long as you keep up with your research, test for yourself, and exercise patience before jumping into a shiny new strategy.

Which strategy is keeping you up all night worrying?

Kevin Ekmark

I am the COO at TrustWorkz, Inc. We help small business grow with affordable digital marketing. Recently, I also started En Pointe Designs, a website design business for dance studios. I also spend my time running a Southern culture site in Atlanta, GA. I like peanut butter, red meat, bourbon, college football, and generally anything nerdy.

http://kevinekmark.com

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One Response to “5 Digital Marketing Strategies to Overcome”

  1. Leo says:

    A few random points:
    1. The only reason you'd want to be on G+, is for those 'verified author profile' badges – that include mugshots of you, which accompany your posts in Google search results. Thats it.
    2. Email marketing is well and truly dead, at least for me. Granted, a good list can still get you targeted traffic (at least more targeted than social media), it is just too time consuming, and yields nowhere near the same return on investment and return on resources as social media does.