Where You Should Post These 5 Types Of Content

by Kristy Bolsinger November 21st, 2012 

social-channels

One of the first things that we learn about in any communications field is the importance of knowing your audience. This helps us tailor our messaging. Just as we need to know whom we are addressing, our audience also wants to know why theyre being addressed. When users are preparing to engage a brand online they want to know what they're going to get.

This mutual need for clarity drives home the importance of having an obvious and clear purpose across all of your online channels. This includes social.

One of the most common questions I hear from practitioners is about where to put contenthow much, how often, and what goes in. The purpose of each channel (Twitter, Facebook, etc) is going to be determined by what you know about your audience and how they want and need to interact with you. For nearly everyone this is going to look different so Im not going to try and tell you how to structure that.

Each of these channels can have a distinct or overlapping purpose. They likely will even change and evolve over time. They will also share much of the same content " perhaps with a different presentation layer.

It is an iterative process though; so dont feel like youre carving anything in stone. You measure and learn and adapt. Right?

With that, lets look at 5 types of content, what format theyre best presented in and which platforms theyre best suited for.

Cultural

This bucket holds all of those Halloween team pictures, and office puppies that stop by. Anything that you are sharing with your community that gives a behind the scenes look, or is being shared to communicate your organizational values and culture would group here.

Places to share: Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, G+, Instagram

Format: Any style can be used, but likely the most effective are images and video.

News/updates

Whether you're sharing a press release or a product update you're likely going to be sharing that information with your online community. Social channels are a great place to share this information and help to proactively address the concerns of your audience " especially useful for those whose products/services have seasonal (re: foreseeable) cycles.

Places to share: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, blog.

Format: Video, text.

Help & How-to

Take a look at your call logs or even your website analytics and youll see some trends in what are some of your customers frequently asked questions. Take this information and create evergreen pieces of content that can form the foundation of an online knowledge base.

Places to share: Facebook, Twitter, blog.

Format: Video, text.

Product Use

One of the best ways to increase your customers entanglement with your product or product environment is to help them use it more. More, more frequently and more deeply. Consider showcasing creative uses for your product, innovative ways to use your services, or even alternative/extreme ways to leverage your product.

Places to share: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, blogbasically all of them depending on your product of course.

Format: Video, text, image.

Promotional

For the most part when were talking about social channels, youll want to temper the percentage of promotional content youre pushing. There is however, always a time and place for promotional content. Try and feature content tailored to the audience on each platform in a way that is relevant and interesting as there is a great deal of noise in social channels.

Places to share: any of your profiles. Remember that certain formats will be better suited to specific platforms. Tailor your content for those arenas.

Format: Video, text, image.

Determining the type of content that goes on what channel and in which format is a bit of a puzzle. There is no one-size fit all formula. But by analyzing your customer needs, habits and the channels you have available to you youll be able to find the combination that best meets their needs and helps drive real business impact for you. Consider these types of content to help brainstorm ways to stretch your current creation engine and find innovative presentations.

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Kristy Bolsinger

Kristy Bolsinger is a Senior Associate at PwC in Seattle, WA. She has previously worked at Ant's Eye View (acquired by PwC in 2012), and RealNetworks (GameHouse). Prior to her time at RealNetworks, and Ant's Eye View - Kristy was working as a Social Media Marketing Consultant and completing her MBA at Willamette University. She maintains a social media blog and can also be found on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

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4 Responses to “Where You Should Post These 5 Types Of Content”

  1. Thanks for the useful article. I realize the post is about posting to social channels, so this comment might be off base, but e-mail is another effective way to address your audience.

  2. Javi says:

    1 in every 7 people in the world has a Facebook profile. Twitter, while not as big, also boasts some pretty impressive numbers. These are two of the largest social mediums out there, and hence there are large groups of different segments of all kinds on these two. While the likes of Pinterest and LinkedIn attract people that lie in certain specific demographics, FB and Twitter have a more mass-appeal. No matter what content you have, it should go on Facebook and Twitter.

    • Kristy says:

      Javi – agree that most every brand or company should have a presence on Facebook and Twitter. I don't agree that every piece of content you create belongs there or ought to be shared there. You must be critical about what those audiences need and want – not just blast them.